History of Humanities

Last week, I taught about Anquetil-Duperron, William Jones, the discovery of language similarity and the beginnings of IE Studies. Disciplines such as Iranian Studies or #Indology, as we know them today, would not have been possible without those efforts and contributions. I also made it a point to at least briefly discuss “genesis amnesia” and the critical examination of Oriental Studies offered by @tavak in

  • Tavakoli-Targhi, Mohamad. 2001. Refashioning Iran: Orientalism, occidentalism and historiography. Palgrave Macmillan.

I was glad to discover this morning, the wonderful 2019 themed issue of “History of Humanities“, Vol 4(2), dedicated to “Classics of the Humanities” & edited, it seems, by @rensbod & Kasper Eskildsen. This is the original tweet by Rens Bod:

Our anthology on The Classics of the Humanities has been published, and it’s free!
https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/toc/hoh/current
It includes foundational texts from philology, historiography, art history, literary theory, oriental studies, archaeology, linguistics, digital humanities and more.

https://twitter.com/rensbod/status/1188024358071087104

As @rensbod writes, the volume “includes foundational texts from philology, historiography, art history, literary theory, oriental studies, archaeology, linguistics, digital humanities and more.”

“Some texts have been translated into English for the first time.” For instance, “Karl Lachmann’s introduction to stemmatic philology” which has until now been available only in Latin.

The original texts are here: historyofhumanities.org/resources/

Ritual Matter(s): Nowruz Ceremonies of the Zoroastrian New Year in Tehran – Ajam Media Collective


Another photo essay by Behrad Mistry, again from last year and over at the Ajam Media Collective.

The Zoroastrian New Year coincides with the Spring Equinox. It marks not only the beginning of the calendar, but the renewal of life in its perennial struggle with death. This annual milestone is an occasion for celebration, and involves a series of ritual arrangements and acts.

Source: Ritual Matter(s): Nowruz Ceremonies of the Zoroastrian New Year in Tehran – Ajam Media Collective

Zoroastrian Nowruz in Tehran: Celebrating the “Big Five” – Ajam Media Collective

A commented photo essay from last year by Behrad Mistry over at the Ajam Media Collective.

The following is a photo essay by Behrad Nafissi Mistry. Born into the caste of Zoroastrian priests, Behrad is half Indian Parsi, half Iranian and is currently training to also serve as a priest. Behrad is a photo-journalist at Amordad Zoroastrian News Agency and Humans of Tehran. He holds a B.A. in English Literature and an M.A. in Comparative Literature from Shahid Beheshti University. This series will focus on Tehran’s Zoroastrian community and their practices before, during, and after Nowruz.

Source: Zoroastrian Nowruz in Tehran: Celebrating the “Big Five” – Ajam Media Collective

Abadan:Retold

Abadan:Retold is an innovative, multi-media social history project invented and managed by Rasmus Christian Elling, an Associate Professor of Iranian Studies at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

A crucial part of the project is an online portal (www.abadan.wiki) with multiple functions.

  • The AbadanMap: a multi-layered interactive map based on GIS data, human data and historical information, drawing on a broad range of maps from open sources and from historical archives;
  • Encyclopaedia Abadanica: an archive of research-based articles by excellent scholars on all aspects of Abadan’s history, from ancient times to present-day, as well as on Abadani popular culture;
  • MemoryLine: a user-driven history wiki – an open platform on which everyone can share memories and knowledge through comments, essays, interviews and pictures, and where you can discover new faces or re-connect with old friends.

Abadan:Retold is part of a larger research project on documenting the history of Abadan in a global context, for which Rasmus Christian Elling received a grant from the Danish Arthur Christensen Foundation. The project has also been supported by private individuals who donated money during the crowdfunding campaign in February 2015.

You can follow the progress of the project on its FB page!

Masters of Persian calligraphy

Congratulations to Hamidreza Ghelichkhani, who curated and annotated this delightful anthology in collaboration with Kambiz GhaneaBassiri.

This anthology invites audiences to interact with select works of Iranian masters of calligraphy from the tenth to the twentieth century. These works were carefully chosen to represent the artistic canon that has shaped the world of calligraphy in contemporary Iran. Their influence has in many cases exceeded the national boundaries of modern Iran, and the earlier works helped spread Persianate culture throughout West Asia in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern era.

Source: Home – Masterpieces of Persian Calligraphy